Research & Supervision

Recently I am working in four research major topics;
  • The Ceramic Project

    In profiling the work of art itself as a research undertaking, I explore historical and contemporary practices and their affective as well as material engagement.
  • Memories of Childhood
  • Each figure has a different character and identity, each has its relationship with the previous and the following figure, making them appear like an inseparable whole  Hands and feet dominate the shape of the figures, hinting at the importance of holding on to each other.

  • Digital Art Project. 
  •      Practical research projects Digital Art Project This research project is an attempt to describe the effects of digital art on the fine art and how we can benefit from digital technology in producing an art that comprise of same visual effect on viewers and able to show the artist’s ability in merging colours and digital technic to form a piece of art work. For this project I would like to achieve 35 pieces of design work using drawing, then scanning them and using the Photoshop I will colour them and print the whole work on a canvas where later to be exhibited.

    The theme of this project is based on Shingal and Kobani tragedies and shows how terror and betrayal that destroy the beauty of life and to show that through reviving colours we can give a meaning to life and its existence.

    Motivation art of Sherko Bekas’s  poet 

    Motivation art of Sherko Bekas’s latest poet This research shows the importance of motivation in literature and its old root in the history of art. Motivation in literature has provided a deeper understanding for researchers to broaden their thinking. Art motivation is well adapted in East and was widely adapted by writers and poets and arabesque and nature used as illustration. In this research I emphasise on the use of art motivation in the last piece of work by the prominent Kurdsih poet, Sherko Bekas, which is published for the first time. Sherko’s work tells a story of a “bicycle” in Kirkuk that symbolises the political, socio-economic situation and the suffering of the residents in Kirkuk regardless of their ethnicity or religion. For this research I 

    preparing 40 pieces drawings to be published

    Meaning of Tragedy in art drawing This piece of research illustrates the importance of art drawing in the history of art especially in the embodiment of human tragedies and disasters. From this point of view, I want to undertake an art project to illuminate the horror of war, particularly the horror of terror that is fast spreading which has impacted our life. In this research project I use free drawing on canvas, cartoon, papers and cardboards. The figures tell a story of human tragedy but at the same time the figures are connected in showing solidarity to overcome the tragedy of horror and war. The work will consist of 40 drawing and 80 meter size on cardboards and will be exhibited in due course.

    Tragedy in art drawing

    Meaning of Tragedy in art drawing This piece of research illustrates the importance of art drawing in the history of art especially in the embodiment of human tragedies and disasters. From this point of view, I want to undertake an art project to illuminate the horror of war, particularly the horror of terror that is fast spreading which has impacted our life. In this research project I use free drawing on canvas, cartoon, papers and cardboards. The figures tell a story of human tragedy but at the same time the figures are connected in showing solidarity to overcome the tragedy of horror and war. The work will consist of 40 drawing and 80 meter size on cardboards and will be exhibited in due course.


    Kurdish Political and Cultural Identity

My research project is about my artistic practice in ceramics and about my efforts to build the new Modern Art Museum in Kurdistan.
In Chapter One I will describe the context to my practice projects. Beginning with the historical context I will examine how culture and politics evolved in Kurdistan since the First World War, giving special emphasis to the development of modern art and the reciprocal influences of European art on Iraqi and Kurdish artists.
Following on I will speak about my personal history – childhood, education, involvement in the artistic life and political struggle in Kurdistan; my life as an artist-in-exile in Iran, France and the UK (the artistic projects in Europe, the USA, Japan and the Middle East, which I have been involved in, will be described in some detail); finally, my return to Kurdistan in 2004 after fourteen years in exile (taking up a post as teacher at the Fine Art College at Suleimany University and working on the realization of the Crossing Museum) - a journey which is as much an artistic journey as a geographic one.
Chapter Two will be leading on from the historical background. I will deal with the particular questions concerning my practical ceramic work in the context of contemporary developments in that field.
The work for my practical project has strong links with the history and tragedy of my country and deals with memory and life experience. I chose to work with the ceramic medium as an important material, signifying earth, land and preservation of the past. For this purpose I worked for several months during each of the four years of my study in an artisan-potter’s workshop in my hometown of Suleimany. I created the ceramic pieces with local clays and using the old methods. While working with the traditional potter Wasta Haidar, I became aware of the valuable traditions and ways of working with clay, which had been practised for centuries and passed on between generations. I included this as a vital part in my writing, referring also to research in the Archaeological and Ethnographic Museums in Kurdistan as well as in Turkey and Iran.
As a result of this complex and multi-faceted reflection, the six distinct groups of ceramic work are presented and discussed in sub-chapters under the titles ‘A People in Flight’, ‘’Pot of Life’, ‘Memories of Childhood’, ‘Diary of a Month’, ‘Victims’, ‘Collage/Fragments’. The section on Colour talks about the deep-rooted significance of colour in the cultural (especially poetry), religious and political traditions in Kurdistan and how this is reflected in the use of colour in my artwork.
Chapter Three is a case study about the Museum Project - telling the story from its beginning as a poem in 1987 until the completion of the building of the Crossing Museum in 2012. First ideas formed by international artist supporters and myself to assemble a collection of artwork for Kurdistan; the campaign to win the support of Kurdish politicians for a modern art museum in my home town of Suleimany, Kurdistan/Iraq to find a permanent home for the collection of ‘The Donation’; acquisition of land in the Azadi Freedom Park to build the museum as a historically significant place of commemoration of the victims to dictatorship; official support from the Ministry of Culture of the Kurdish government and financial backing for museum building.
The historical and cultural context for the Crossing Museum is charted through a mapping of existing museums, private galleries and the Fine Art Institute and College of Art. The emblematic nature of the museum architecture, its design features, exibition spaces and location within the city context is described in detail in the chapter on form and function of the museum. The destabilising impact of the political upheavals on the museum project in the period after 2003, which threatened to derail the building work and had a detrimental effect on the progress of the project are laid bare as well as the efforts to continue with renewed support.
The discourse on the nature of the museum, its mission and artistic and educational objectives is discussed in the final section: the Crossing Museum as a bridge between Kurdistan and the world and its significance for the cultural life of Kurdistan. Practical steps towards a professional structure for the museum are elaborated and the various aspects of museum practice analysed. Finally, the Museum programme, initial exhibitions and events
scheduling is detailed (emphasis on the history of Kurdish art of the 20th and 21st century and exhibition projects about memory by contemporary artists).
It is the overarching task of this chapter to find answers to the questions of how to bring cultures together and how a museum can become the platform to achieve this. The need to find a permanent place for the art collection, ‘The Donation’, which had been assembled outside of Kurdistan in solidarity between international and Kurdish artists, generated the idea of a museum. Its completion and future existence is a milestone in the cultural life of my country.
As much as I am an artist in my own right, my work for over more than thirty years has been concerned with creating a platform for artists. Taking responsibility as artist or maker of artwork and as art intermediary for other artists, is based on my credibility as an artist who understands the specific problems from the perspective of the maker. Studying Fine Art in Europe, building an Art Association with European artists and working as arts educator in educational establishments in Europe, has given me invaluable experience which I can now build on in guiding the work for the Museum.
All parts of my research project are intricately connected, as they form two essential and inseparable practices in my artistic life: being a creative artist at the same time as contributing  to build the cultural foundations for modern art and art education in Kurdistan.
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